What's Fresh

What’s Fresh – July 12

Peaches and blueberries continue, and with the addition of cantaloupe and watermelon the market has a fresh, summery fruit scent.

If you find shelled peas, strawberries, or broccoli, buy now as those seasons are ending. Cabbage, beets, and carrots will also be in short supply.

The classic summer vegetables – cucumbers, squash, peppers, and tomatoes – are plentiful. Also available are corn, onions, potatoes, green beans, eggplant, okra, Malabar and water spinach, micro-cilantro, squash blossoms, arugula flowers, garlic, and tomatillos.

Herbs, such as mints, spicy oregano, and basil varietals are on offer. Several sprouts and wheat grass are also available. Green leafy vegetables can be grown hydroponically in green houses so find a selection for salads or cooking. Kale continues due to hard work on the part of the farmers to keep it going.

Non-produce items include pastured beef, lamb, pork, and chicken raised on a natural diet. Free range eggs, Artisan cheeses, butter, Gulf seafood, honey, a large variety of prepared foods, snacks and desserts, mixes, lemonade and coffee, popsicles, vinegar and olive oil along with doggie treats, soaps and lotions, bedding and edible plants round out the offerings.

Veggie Valet is now available on both the east and west sides of the market to assist customers in getting heavy purchases to their cars. Find the bins and ask a teen how it works. Or leave purchases in a bin, take the corresponding number card, and pull up your car to avoid carrying items long distances.  For more information, please see here.

We are a local, seasonal farmers market; meaning that our farmers bring only what is ripening in their fields each week and some produce is short lived due to a short growing season. Eating with the seasons takes education, awareness and patience! For a chart of what’s in season now, click here. Our farmers use various growing methods. Some produce is organic (not certified), some is sustainable, and some is grown conventionally. Just ask the farmers.

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