News

eggs,HiramFarms

Chickens and Eggs

Customers comment that the eggs at the CFM don’t look like those in the grocery store. This is a direct result of varieties of hens running around outside, foraging on the land out in the pasture grasses.

A few years ago, Pat Daly researched the types of hens laying for our market. Most of the hens belong to breeds recognized by the American Poultry Association. The recognized breeds include:

Ameraucana – developed from the Araucana and other breeds and recently recognized by...   | Read More
Kohl rabi, carrots - spring

What’s Fresh – April 19

What’s fresh at the market now includes tomatoes, grown and ripened in the ground! Committee members were also surprised to find them this early. The Dead End Farm family uses frost cloth with long strings of old fashioned large, warm Christmas lights underneath to keep the plants warm and the tomatoes growing despite the late cold weather. Leafy greens and lettuces are growing larger in size. Cruciferous vegetables include kale, arugula, Chinese cabbage, bok choy, Swiss chard, mustard...   | Read More

Certified Organic Explained

Several farmers at the Coppell Farmers Market use sustainable farming methods. The label of Certified Organic can only be used after certification by the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) or other certifying organization. For example, Good Earth Organic Farm is certified organic through the California Certified Organic Farmers. This is a farmers association, as well as a certification body. Pure Land Organic near McKinney is in the process of obtaining certification through...   | Read More

The Seasons of Food,blueberries

The Seasons of Food

The Coppell Farmers Market is a seasonal, local market. This means a product found in June may not be available in November. While a three year old little boy looking for “boo berries” last March didn’t understand why blueberries wouldn’t be back for a long time, most customers now realize this although they may be disappointed the blueberries are gone until next May.

What some don’t understand is that cooler weather doesn’t mean all cool weather produce is suddenly...   | Read More

StacyFinley'sFarm

Water Concerns

Water needs vary by the time of the year and the type of agricultural product being raised. All agricultural producers welcome the slow rains that soak deep into the soil, taking the roots down below the scorching shallow soil areas. Stressed fields and pastures respond immediately to a good gentle rain in a way they don’t with irrigation from a processed water source.

What do our growers do when the rain does not occur when needed? Some have catch ponds that capture runoff...   | Read More

Weathertop Vendor approval process,Farm 4-29-2012 003

Vendor Approval Process

Coppell Farmers Market hosts a variety of producers each Saturday morning. This doesn’t happen by accident. Vendors go through a process to be admitted to the market line up for a booth assignment, and ongoing review and annual renewal process to continue to come.

Most vendors report they heard about this market by word of mouth from other vendors or visitors to the market. They then inquire about the online application process and fill out and submit an application found on the...   | Read More

Value added products

Value Added Products

Many of the vendors at the Coppell Farmers Market bring value added products. What does this mean? The simple definition is taking a basic agricultural product and adding to it for variety and value.

CJ Singleton of Good Spice sells pepper seasonings and nuts to which he adds chili, onion, garlic, and citrus fruits that he personally dehydrates for vibrant flavors. He has taken this a step further by capturing the resulting lemon and lime juices, adding maple sweetening and...   | Read More

Using the whole plant,radishes

Using the whole plant to boost nutrition and curb waste

Just as shopping at a farmers market is a proactive way of supporting the local food system, controlling food waste in your own home is a proactive step in maximizing resources, in other words you’re increasing the value of the farmers’ efforts besides stretching your food dollar. Think of produce parts we often discard: broccoli leaves, green onion tops, carrot tops, beet greens, cauliflower cores, broccoli stems, collard flowers and stems, radish leaves, etc. Today’s...   | Read More

Pumpkins

Pumpkins!

Ever wonder how pumpkin carving came about? Actually a wave of Irish immigrants brought the concept over in the 1800’s. Originally they used very large turnips, beets or potatoes to carve but soon realized an easier time of it by using pumpkins.

The pumpkin is not a vegetable, but a fruit and was originally grown in Central America. Native Americans used to roast them over an open fire for eating. The original pumpkin pie was actually spices, milk and honey stuffed into a...   | Read More

Meet the Market Manager

Meet the Market Manager

In August of 2012, the Coppell Farmers Market introduced our new Market Manager, Dan Maddalena. His was a familiar face as a customer and then manned the Savoy Sorbet booth for a few months until taking this position. Dan filled the vacancy left when long time manager, Bob Timmerman, retired. Customers will recognize Maddalena wearing his brimmed hat, hustling up and down the market and helping wherever he can, assisted by his daughter Rachel.

When asked how he came to shop the...   | Read More

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